Smithsonian, August 2021

As devastating wildfires rage throughout the American West, fire agencies across the region are turning to cutting-edge technologies from supercomputers generating near-real-time fire maps to fireball-dropping drones to enhance the way they respond to these disasters.

Fires are still won and lost through grueling work on the…

The Guardian, July 2021

The American west has a sprawling network of dams, reservoirs and pipelines that brings a supply of water to its cities and farms. But overexploitation and a two-decade dry spell have put a severe strain on the resources, with reserves dwindling to historic lows in some…

The Progressive, May 2021

In the sixty-nine years that Sharon Lavigne has lived on the east bank of the Mississippi River in Louisiana’s St. James Parish, she has seen more than three dozen petrochemical plants turn her community from a rural place with sugar- cane plantations from the state’s history…

Future Human, April 2021

On a warm afternoon in the northeastern Siberian region of Yakutia, farther north than most humans care to live, Sergey Zimov stood below an eroding mudbank along the Kolyma River. …

The prehistoric animals could diffuse the Arctic’s ticking carbon bomb

A woolly mammoth skeleton is displayed at Summers Place Auctions on November 26, 2014 in Billingshurst, England. Photo: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images

On a warm afternoon in the northeastern Siberian region of Yakutia, farther north than most humans care to live, Sergey Zimov stood below an eroding mudbank along the Kolyma River. …

Insider, February 2021

Mario Draghi comes across as unassuming at first. He hardly ever speaks to the press, does not have an “entourage,” and reportedly carries his own bags when he goes on trips.

By various accounts, he’s a family man who avidly supports the football club of his native…

Euronews, January 2021

In the Negev Desert, the sun beams down onto desolate earth. The air is dry and the land arid.

But up on a mountain ridge near the town of Mitzpe Ramon, rows of vines sprout from the scorched soil — the only glimmer of green in a…

Wired UK, August 2020

Two thousand metres up in the mountains above Switzerland’s Engadin Valley, Felix Keller stands in a rocky ridge overlooking the Morteratsch glacier, one of the biggest in the Alps. He points to a rock-strewn plateau speckled with spruces and bushes far beyond him. “In the early…

Climate & Capital, July 2020

Simply cutting CO2 emissions is not enough, says the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. To slow global warming, we need to actually remove carbon from the sky. But how?

As companies turn to the latest carbon-capture technologies, one low-tech solution has been gaining ground: Carbon farming, or regenerative agriculture, an approach rooted in millenia-old techniques that can pull carbon from the air and put it back into the soil. A new generation of startups are connecting carbon-emitting companies with farmers willing to put it into their fields.

[Continue reading on Climate & Capital Media]

Experience, June 2020

To avoid a climate catastrophe and keep the world’s temperature from rising by more than two degrees Celsius, experts say, it’s not enough to just cut pollution. We’ll also have to pull some carbon emissions from the atmosphere. But how? One idea gaining traction is paying farmers to use regenerative practices to store carbon in the soil.

[Continue reading on Experience Magazine]

Marcello Rossi

Freelance writer. My works appeared in National Geographic, The Economist, The Guardian, Al Jazeera, Nature, Smithsonian, Reuters, among many others.

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